SculptureNotebook is an online platform that features artists, events, books, and other cultural material pertinent to issues in contemporary sculpture.

SculptureNotebook is a program of SculptureCenter, a not-for-profit arts institution located in Long Island City, NY and founded by artists in 1928. SculptureCenter focuses on the production of new artwork and presents exhibits by emerging and established artists from New York and around the world.



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READING ROOM: Ayami Awazuhara, A Heart of a Stone, (Bom Dia Boa Tarde Boa Noite, 2014).
From Bom Dia:

Do we think that a stone is a cold and dead material or rather warm and vital? A Heart of a Stone is published as part of the installation by artist Ayami Awazuhara. The work consists of several elements arranged in various display structures. The book A Heart of a Stone is part anecdote, part fiction and part sculpture. It was developed in a collaboration with Santiago da Silva.

Courtesy Bom Dia Boa Tarde Boa Noite.

READING ROOM: Ayami Awazuhara, A Heart of a Stone, (Bom Dia Boa Tarde Boa Noite, 2014).

From Bom Dia:

Do we think that a stone is a cold and dead material or rather warm and vital? A Heart of a Stone is published as part of the installation by artist Ayami Awazuhara. The work consists of several elements arranged in various display structures. The book A Heart of a Stone is part anecdote, part fiction and part sculpture. It was developed in a collaboration with Santiago da Silva.

Courtesy Bom Dia Boa Tarde Boa Noite.

WHAT’S ON: Equal Goes it Loose. June 27 - July 20, 2014. News of the World, 50 Resolution Way, London. Courtesy News of the World. 
Featuring: Joscha Blankenburg, Carla Diestelhorst, Timo Grimm, Franz Helffenstein, Christian Kempel, Paula Loeding, Magdalena Los, Elisabeth Moch, Leonie Rottmann, Simon Schete, Pablo Schlumberger, Timon Schmolling, Lukas Schneider, Julia Storz, Markus Vater, Daniel Vier, Sebastian Wiegand, Carlos Zambrano, Ronja Zschoche

WHAT’S ON: Equal Goes it Loose. June 27 - July 20, 2014. News of the World, 50 Resolution Way, London. Courtesy News of the World. 

Featuring: Joscha Blankenburg, Carla Diestelhorst, Timo Grimm, Franz Helffenstein, Christian Kempel, Paula Loeding, Magdalena Los, Elisabeth Moch, Leonie Rottmann, Simon Schete, Pablo Schlumberger, Timon Schmolling, Lukas Schneider, Julia Storz, Markus Vater, Daniel Vier, Sebastian Wiegand, Carlos Zambrano, Ronja Zschoche

WHAT’S ON: Journal. June 25 - September 7, 2014. Institute of Contemporary Art, The Mall, London. 
Featuring: SC Artist Rossella Biscotti, Edson Chagas, Cyprien Gaillard, Paulo Nazareth, Koki Tanaka, Charlotte Prodger, Isla Leaver-Yap, Paul Elliman, Ahmet Ögüt, Richard Sides, Duncan Campbell, Bouchra Khalili, future SC Artist Marlie Mul, Joshua Simon.
Edson Chagas, Found Not Taken, London, 2014. Courtesy Edson Chagas, A Palazzo Gallery, Brescia, and ICA.

WHAT’S ON: Journal. June 25 - September 7, 2014. Institute of Contemporary Art, The Mall, London

Featuring: SC Artist Rossella Biscotti, Edson Chagas, Cyprien Gaillard, Paulo Nazareth, Koki Tanaka, Charlotte Prodger, Isla Leaver-Yap, Paul Elliman, Ahmet Ögüt, Richard Sides, Duncan Campbell, Bouchra Khalili, future SC Artist Marlie Mul, Joshua Simon.

Edson Chagas, Found Not Taken, London, 2014. Courtesy Edson Chagas, A Palazzo Gallery, Brescia, and ICA.

READING ROOM:
Mariana Castillo Deball, Ixiptla (Bom Dia Boa Tarde Boa Noite, 2014)
From Bom Dia:

Originally a Nahua word, ixiptla has been understood as image, delegate, character, and representative. Ixiptla could be a container, but also could be the actualization of power infused into an object or person. In Nahua culture, it took the form of a statue, a vision, or a victim who turned into a god destined to be sacrificed. Without having to visually appear the same, multiple ixiptlas of the same god could exist simultaneously. The distinction between essence and material, and between original and copy vanishes.
This edition of Ixiptla is focused on the trajectory of objects collected and produced by archeologists - plaster molds, facsimiles, drawings, photographs, and scale models -, in an attempt to capture and replicate material evidences left by time; these objects emerge from a specific moment in time, producing a doppelgänger of the original milieu, which then takes its own course. 

Courtesy Bom Dia Boa Tarde Boa Noite.

READING ROOM:

Mariana Castillo Deball, Ixiptla (Bom Dia Boa Tarde Boa Noite, 2014)

From Bom Dia:

Originally a Nahua word, ixiptla has been understood as image, delegate, character, and representative. Ixiptla could be a container, but also could be the actualization of power infused into an object or person. In Nahua culture, it took the form of a statue, a vision, or a victim who turned into a god destined to be sacrificed. Without having to visually appear the same, multiple ixiptlas of the same god could exist simultaneously. The distinction between essence and material, and between original and copy vanishes.

This edition of Ixiptla is focused on the trajectory of objects collected and produced by archeologists - plaster molds, facsimiles, drawings, photographs, and scale models -, in an attempt to capture and replicate material evidences left by time; these objects emerge from a specific moment in time, producing a doppelgänger of the original milieu, which then takes its own course. 

Courtesy Bom Dia Boa Tarde Boa Noite.