SculptureNotebook is an online platform that features artists, events, books, and other cultural material pertinent to issues in contemporary sculpture.

SculptureNotebook is a program of SculptureCenter, a not-for-profit arts institution located in Long Island City, NY and founded by artists in 1928. SculptureCenter focuses on the production of new artwork and presents exhibits by emerging and established artists from New York and around the world.



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READING ROOM: 
Christina von Rotenhan ed., Richard Tuttle: Prints (JRP Ringier, 2014).
From JRP Ringier:

Since the 1970s, in collaboration with renowned printers and publishers, Richard Tuttle has created a diverse printed oeuvre. In sensitively exploiting the unique possibilities of printmaking to make process, materials and actions visible, Tuttle explores the complexity of printmaking processes. “Prints” is the first monograph on Tuttle’s printmaking. Edited by Christina von Rotenhan this publication introduces not only the artist’s unique approach to printmaking with profound scholarly essays and catalogue entries for selected prints between 1973 and 2013, but also reveals Tuttle’s deep interest in the collaborative nature of printmaking.
The timing of the publication is important as Richard Tuttle has also been invited to realize an installation in the Tate’s Turbine Hall. The large-scale installation will provide a powerful counterpoint to the more intimate works from his printed oeuvre.

Courtesy JRP Ringier.

READING ROOM: 

Christina von Rotenhan ed., Richard Tuttle: Prints (JRP Ringier, 2014).

From JRP Ringier:

Since the 1970s, in collaboration with renowned printers and publishers, Richard Tuttle has created a diverse printed oeuvre. In sensitively exploiting the unique possibilities of printmaking to make process, materials and actions visible, Tuttle explores the complexity of printmaking processes. “Prints” is the first monograph on Tuttle’s printmaking. Edited by Christina von Rotenhan this publication introduces not only the artist’s unique approach to printmaking with profound scholarly essays and catalogue entries for selected prints between 1973 and 2013, but also reveals Tuttle’s deep interest in the collaborative nature of printmaking.

The timing of the publication is important as Richard Tuttle has also been invited to realize an installation in the Tate’s Turbine Hall. The large-scale installation will provide a powerful counterpoint to the more intimate works from his printed oeuvre.

Courtesy JRP Ringier.

READING ROOM:
Nick Mauss and Ken Okiishi, One Season in Hell (Mousse Publishing, 2014).
From Mousse:

In the spring of 2007, in New York, as part of an exhibition organized by Gavin Brown’s enterprise, Nick Mauss and Ken Okiishi produced One Season in Hell, an installation whose point of departure was Arthur Rimbaud’s famous extended poem Une saison en enfer. By using Google’s online translation app to obtain an English version of the original text, Ken Okiishi first of all appropriated it and peppered it with jokes, puns and references to popular culture, from Karl Lagerfeld to South Park by way of the hairstyles of certain Japanese teenagers and Volvo cars. Nick Mauss, for his part, annotated the text, and then drew on it.

 In tandem, the artists then published an eponymous book in which these pages were all brought together, in an edition of 500, which was quickly sold out. From 13 May to 14 August 2011, Nick Mauss presented his very first solo show in an institution at the FRAC Champagne-Ardenne. It was in the wake of this exhibition that Nick Mauss and Ken Okiishi expressed their wish to re-issue One Season in Hell, whose outcome both offers us a new way of looking at Rimbaud’s oeuvre and extends their respective praxes in a remarkable way.

Courtesy Mousse Publishing.

READING ROOM:

Nick Mauss and Ken Okiishi, One Season in Hell (Mousse Publishing, 2014).

From Mousse:

In the spring of 2007, in New York, as part of an exhibition organized by Gavin Brown’s enterprise, Nick Mauss and Ken Okiishi produced One Season in Hell, an installation whose point of departure was Arthur Rimbaud’s famous extended poem Une saison en enfer. By using Google’s online translation app to obtain an English version of the original text, Ken Okiishi first of all appropriated it and peppered it with jokes, puns and references to popular culture, from Karl Lagerfeld to South Park by way of the hairstyles of certain Japanese teenagers and Volvo cars. Nick Mauss, for his part, annotated the text, and then drew on it.

 In tandem, the artists then published an eponymous book in which these pages were all brought together, in an edition of 500, which was quickly sold out. From 13 May to 14 August 2011, Nick Mauss presented his very first solo show in an institution at the FRAC Champagne-Ardenne. It was in the wake of this exhibition that Nick Mauss and Ken Okiishi expressed their wish to re-issue One Season in Hell, whose outcome both offers us a new way of looking at Rimbaud’s oeuvre and extends their respective praxes in a remarkable way.

Courtesy Mousse Publishing.

WHAT’S ON: Talent (altgr. talanton für Waage, Gewicht, Währung), July 5 - August 2, 2014. 401 Contemporary, Potsdamer Strasse 81 B - 10785 Berlin-Tiergarten.
Featuring: James Gregory Atkinson & Helen Demisch, Stuart Bailes, Alexandra Baumgartner, Manuele Cerutti, Julian Charrièrre, Nadja Frank, Alice Musiol, Jennifer Oellerich, Fiene Scharp, Wanda Stolle, Anita Tarnutzer. 
Courtesy 401 Contemporary.


WHAT’S ON: Talent (altgr. talanton für Waage, Gewicht, Währung), July 5 - August 2, 2014. 401 Contemporary, Potsdamer Strasse 81 B - 10785 Berlin-Tiergarten.

Featuring: James Gregory Atkinson & Helen Demisch, Stuart Bailes, Alexandra Baumgartner, Manuele Cerutti, Julian Charrièrre, Nadja Frank, Alice Musiol, Jennifer Oellerich, Fiene Scharp, Wanda Stolle, Anita Tarnutzer. 

Courtesy 401 Contemporary.