SculptureNotebook is an online platform that features artists, events, books, and other cultural material pertinent to issues in contemporary sculpture.

SculptureNotebook is a program of SculptureCenter, a not-for-profit arts institution located in Long Island City, NY and founded by artists in 1928. SculptureCenter focuses on the production of new artwork and presents exhibits by emerging and established artists from New York and around the world.



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WHAT’S ON: Taipei Biennial The Great Acceleration: Art in the Athropocene, September 13, 2014 - January 4, 2015. Taipei Fine Arts Museum, No. 181, Sec. 3, Zhongshan N. Road, Zhongshan District, Taipai City, 10461, Taiwan.
Featuring SculptureCenter artists: Alisa Baemboym, Neil Beloufa, Ian Cheng, David Douard, Camille Henrot, Maria Loboda, Marlie Mul, Rachel Rose, Pamela Rosenkranz, Anicka Yi. 
David Douard, Mo’Swallow, 2014. Courtesy the artist and Galerie Chantal Crousel, Paris. 

WHAT’S ON: Taipei Biennial The Great Acceleration: Art in the AthropoceneSeptember 13, 2014 - January 4, 2015. Taipei Fine Arts Museum, No. 181, Sec. 3, Zhongshan N. Road, Zhongshan District, Taipai City, 10461, Taiwan.

Featuring SculptureCenter artists: Alisa Baemboym, Neil Beloufa, Ian Cheng, David Douard, Camille Henrot, Maria Loboda, Marlie Mul, Rachel Rose, Pamela Rosenkranz, Anicka Yi

David Douard, Mo’Swallow, 2014. Courtesy the artist and Galerie Chantal Crousel, Paris

WHAT’S ON: Antoine Catala, New Feelings, September 28- November 2, 2014. 47 Canal, 291 Grand St, New York, NY.
From Antoine Catala and 47 Canal:

I don’t feel the same anymore. I feel new. I don’t know how to describe the sensation. Do you? Can you feel how I feel? Is really the sole purpose of emotions the survival of a gene pool? The ultimate bonding gel. Through the screen, can you tell how I feel? My voice, do I sound nervous or happy? Can one learn new feelings? A new type of anger, with a hint of pride, a new breed of painless joy. Can you teach me how to feel, because I lost touch? It’s like something recently severed, and emotions are drifting inside of me. When I was a little boy, I put myself in other’s shoes. I would mimic people around me, copy the way they walked, the way they sat or spoke. It would open a window into their minds. Empathic machines are coming, like children, learning. Will I be able to outsource my feelings to emobots one day. I wouldn’t have to deal with shitty emotions anymore. Let the emobots process my crappy moods and re-infuse my body with good vibes. Fleeting. If emotionomics is to become a reality, would I ever be able to purchase a meal with the sensation of freedom that permeates through me today? Pay with a confused transactional smile. This is personal, and it’s not. It’s all transparent. Let’s put our feelings on the table.

Read about Antoine Catala’s involvement in the current SC exhibition Puddle, Pothole, Portal (October 2, 2014 - January 5, 2015).
Courtesy 47 Canal.

WHAT’S ON: Antoine Catala, New Feelings, September 28- November 2, 2014. 47 Canal, 291 Grand St, New York, NY.

From Antoine Catala and 47 Canal:

I don’t feel the same anymore. 
I feel new. I don’t know how to describe the sensation. 
Do you? 
Can you feel how I feel? 
Is really the sole purpose of emotions the survival of a gene pool? The ultimate bonding gel. 
Through the screen, can you tell how I feel? My voice, do I sound nervous or happy? 
Can one learn new feelings? A new type of anger, with a hint of pride, a new breed of painless joy. 
Can you teach me how to feel, because I lost touch? 
It’s like something recently severed, and emotions are drifting inside of me. 
When I was a little boy, I put myself in other’s shoes. I would mimic people around me, 
copy the way they walked, the way they sat or spoke. It would open a window into their minds. 
Empathic machines are coming, like children, learning. 
Will I be able to outsource my feelings to emobots one day. I wouldn’t have to deal with shitty 
emotions 
anymore. Let the emobots process my crappy moods and re-infuse my body with good vibes. 
Fleeting. 
If emotionomics is to become a reality, would I ever be able to purchase a meal with the 
sensation of 
freedom that permeates through me today? Pay with a confused transactional smile. 
This is personal, and it’s not. 
It’s all transparent. Let’s put our feelings on the table.

Read about Antoine Catala’s involvement in the current SC exhibition Puddle, Pothole, Portal (October 2, 2014 - January 5, 2015).

Courtesy 47 Canal.

READING ROOM: 
Lucie Stahl, Plakate Posters (Bom Dia Boa Tarde Boa Noite, 2011). 
Excerpt from the book by contributor Chris Kraus:

Invited by Lucie Stahl to respond to her gorgeous and trashy collaged posters, I look back in my diary and am surprised by the number of parallels in our dreams and notations. I’ve never met Lucie Stahl but we live in the same world: oil spills, palm fronds, novelty key chains, sports beverages. Like me, she’s a self-appointed reporter. Stahl’s posters begin with her odd inclination to write down fragments of overheard conversations, ambient thoughts and fleeting anxieties that – once preserved (and obsessively so, under buckets of chemical gloss) function as video-grabs from the deluge of information that we understand, more or less, to comprise consciousness.

Read about Lucie Stahl’s involvement in the current SC exhibition Puddle, Pothole, Portal (October 2, 2014 - January 5, 2015).
Courtesy Bom Dia Boa Tarde Boa Noite. 

READING ROOM: 

Lucie Stahl, Plakate Posters (Bom Dia Boa Tarde Boa Noite, 2011). 

Excerpt from the book by contributor Chris Kraus:

Invited by Lucie Stahl to respond to her gorgeous and trashy collaged posters, I look back in my diary and am surprised by the number of parallels in our dreams and notations. I’ve never met Lucie Stahl but we live in the same world: oil spills, palm fronds, novelty key chains, sports beverages. Like me, she’s a self-appointed reporter. Stahl’s posters begin with her odd inclination to write down fragments of overheard conversations, ambient thoughts and fleeting anxieties that – once preserved (and obsessively so, under buckets of chemical gloss) function as video-grabs from the deluge of information that we understand, more or less, to comprise consciousness.

Read about Lucie Stahl’s involvement in the current SC exhibition Puddle, Pothole, Portal (October 2, 2014 - January 5, 2015).

Courtesy Bom Dia Boa Tarde Boa Noite

READING ROOM:
The Happy Hypocrite - Freedom, Issue No. 6, Edited by Lynne Tillman (Bookworks, London, 2013).
From Bookworks:

'I think: Protect me from people who want to protect me; but more, save me from people who know what upsets others.’ - Lynne Tillman
This new issue of The Happy Hypocrite challenges the restraining notions found in art and writing about who and what can and cannot speak. What can and cannot be said or thought. In part a response to Kafka - to that which we don’t know has damaged us – freedom is presented as an important and urgent concept, and a complicated word, in which and beside which hypocrisy also resides. (Hypocrisy can be construed as a freedom). The Happy Hypocrite offers its pages to ingenious fictional, nonfictional, and visual responses to the various meanings of ‘freedom’.

Featuring contributions from Gregg Bordowitz, Paul Chan, Gabriel Coxhead, Lydia Davis, Yasmine El Rashidi, Chloé Cooper Jones, James Jennings, Allison Katz, Robin Coste Lewis, the late Craig Owens, Sarah Resnick, Ranbir Singh Sidhu, Abdellah Taïa, an interview between Lynne Tillman and Thomas Keenan, a cover by Susan Hiller, and archival material from Paranoids Anonymous Newsletter.
Read about artist Allison Katz’s involvement in the upcoming SC exhibition Puddle, Pothole, Portal (October 2, 2014 - January 5, 2015).
Courtesy Bookworks, London.

READING ROOM:

The Happy Hypocrite - Freedom, Issue No. 6, Edited by Lynne Tillman (Bookworks, London, 2013).

From Bookworks:

'I think: Protect me from people who want to protect me; but more, save me from people who know what upsets others.’ - Lynne Tillman

This new issue of The Happy Hypocrite challenges the restraining notions found in art and writing about who and what can and cannot speak. What can and cannot be said or thought. In part a response to Kafka - to that which we don’t know has damaged us – freedom is presented as an important and urgent concept, and a complicated word, in which and beside which hypocrisy also resides. (Hypocrisy can be construed as a freedom). The Happy Hypocrite offers its pages to ingenious fictional, nonfictional, and visual responses to the various meanings of ‘freedom’.

Featuring contributions from Gregg Bordowitz, Paul Chan, Gabriel Coxhead, Lydia Davis, Yasmine El Rashidi, Chloé Cooper Jones, James Jennings, Allison Katz, Robin Coste Lewis, the late Craig Owens, Sarah Resnick, Ranbir Singh Sidhu, Abdellah Taïa, an interview between Lynne Tillman and Thomas Keenan, a cover by Susan Hiller, and archival material from Paranoids Anonymous Newsletter.

Read about artist Allison Katz’s involvement in the upcoming SC exhibition Puddle, Pothole, Portal (October 2, 2014 - January 5, 2015).

Courtesy Bookworks, London.