Founded by artists in 1928, SculptureCenter is a not-for-profit arts institution located in Long Island City, NY. We commission new work and present exhibits by emerging and established artists from New York and around the world. Our Tumblr site focuses on emerging artists and work that offers new ways of considering sculpture, or furthers the understanding of the discipline and how it can intersect with other mediums. Content is selected by SculptureCenter’s curatorial staff and guest curators.

visit www.sculpture-center.org

ON VIEW AT SCULPTURECENTER: 
In Practice: Chance Motives, February 5-8, 2014
Hayley A. Silverman, Bluebirds ft. ‘Make Believe’, 2014. Performance, 20 min. Sung by Mia Ardito, Jeannine Han, Nettie Smith, & Geo Wyeth. Acted by Charlie, Frankie, Hester, Jeff, Phin, Venus, & others. Commissioned by SculptureCenter for In Practice: Chance Motives, February 5-8, 2014, Courtesy the artist and SculptureCenter. 
LYRICS:
Hallelujah I’m a Bum!, Written by Harry McClintock / Melody: Traditional Hymn “Revive Us Again”


I love to breath the air and feel I’m free
I never have to care what becomes of me
I don’t give a stitch, if i never get rich
not a soul i know, never owed me dough
when a man goes red i don’t lose my head
i find great enjoyment in unemployment
I’m the only man that the world cant overcome
in other words gentlemen, Hallelujah I’m a bum

The weather’ s getting fine.
The coffee tastes like wine.
You happy hobo, sing,
"Hallelujah, I’m a bum again!"
Why work away for wealth
When you can travel for your health?
It’ s spring, you hobo, sing,
"Hallelujah, I’m a bum again!"

Your home is always near;
The moon’s your chandelier;
Your ceiling is the sky,
Way up high.

The road is your estate,
The world your little dinner plate;
It’s spring, you hobo, sing,
"Hallelujah, I’m a bum again!"

….

=========================

We’re in the Money, written by Al Dubin
Gone are my blues and gone are my tears.
I’ve got good news to shout in your ears.
The long lost dollar has come back to the fold.
With silver you can turn your dreams to gold.
We’re in the money,
We’re in the money;
We’ve got a lot of what it takes to get along!
We’re in the money,
The sky is sunny;
Old Man Depression, you are through,
You done us wrong!
We never see a headline
'Bout a breadline, today
And when we see the landlord
We can look that guy right in the eye
We’re in the money
Come, on my honey,
Let’s spend it, lend it, send it rolling along
We’re in the money,
We’re in the money;
We’ve got a lot of what it takes to get along!
We’re in the money,
The sky is sunny;
Old Man Depression, you are through,

You done us wrong!

…

ON VIEW AT SCULPTURECENTER

In Practice: Chance Motives, February 5-8, 2014

Hayley A. SilvermanBluebirds ft. ‘Make Believe’, 2014. Performance, 20 min. Sung by Mia Ardito, Jeannine Han, Nettie Smith, & Geo Wyeth. Acted by Charlie, Frankie, Hester, Jeff, Phin, Venus, & others. Commissioned by SculptureCenter for In Practice: Chance Motives, February 5-8, 2014, Courtesy the artist and SculptureCenter. 

LYRICS:

Hallelujah I’m a Bum!, Written by Harry McClintock / Melody: Traditional Hymn “Revive Us Again”
I love to breath the air and feel I’m free
I never have to care what becomes of me
I don’t give a stitch, if i never get rich
not a soul i know, never owed me dough
when a man goes red i don’t lose my head
i find great enjoyment in unemployment
I’m the only man that the world cant overcome
in other words gentlemen, Hallelujah I’m a bum
The weather’ s getting fine.
The coffee tastes like wine.
You happy hobo, sing,
"Hallelujah, I’m a bum again!"
Why work away for wealth
When you can travel for your health?
It’ s spring, you hobo, sing,
"Hallelujah, I’m a bum again!"
Your home is always near;
The moon’s your chandelier;
Your ceiling is the sky,
Way up high.
The road is your estate,
The world your little dinner plate;
It’s spring, you hobo, sing,
"Hallelujah, I’m a bum again!"
….
=========================
We’re in the Money, written by Al Dubin
Gone are my blues and gone are my tears.
I’ve got good news to shout in your ears.
The long lost dollar has come back to the fold.
With silver you can turn your dreams to gold.
We’re in the money,
We’re in the money;
We’ve got a lot of what it takes to get along!
We’re in the money,
The sky is sunny;
Old Man Depression, you are through,
You done us wrong!
We never see a headline
'Bout a breadline, today
And when we see the landlord
We can look that guy right in the eye
We’re in the money
Come, on my honey,
Let’s spend it, lend it, send it rolling along
We’re in the money,
We’re in the money;
We’ve got a lot of what it takes to get along!
We’re in the money,
The sky is sunny;
Old Man Depression, you are through,
You done us wrong!
ON VIEW AT SCULPTURECENTER: 
In Practice: Chance Motives, February 5-8, 2014
Rachel Rose, Palisades in Palisades, 2014. Still from video. Commissioned by SculptureCenter for In Practice: Chance Motives, February 5-8, 2014, Courtesy the artist and SculptureCenter. 
Rachel Rose (b.1986, New York, NY) lives and works in NY. She received her MFA from Columbia, an MA from the Courtauld Institute of Art, and her BA from Yale. Recent exhibitions and screenings include Geographies of Contamination at The David Roberts Foundation (London) and Uncanny Valleys at Electronic Arts Intermix (New York).

ON VIEW AT SCULPTURECENTER

In Practice: Chance Motives, February 5-8, 2014

Rachel RosePalisades in Palisades, 2014. Still from video. Commissioned by SculptureCenter for In Practice: Chance Motives, February 5-8, 2014, Courtesy the artist and SculptureCenter. 

Rachel Rose (b.1986, New York, NY) lives and works in NY. She received her MFA from Columbia, an MA from the Courtauld Institute of Art, and her BA from Yale. Recent exhibitions and screenings include Geographies of Contamination at The David Roberts Foundation (London) and Uncanny Valleys at Electronic Arts Intermix (New York).

ON VIEW AT SCULPTURECENTER: 
In Practice: Chance Motives, February 5-8, 2014
Rachel Rose, Palisades in Palisades, 2014. Still from video. Commissioned by SculptureCenter for In Practice: Chance Motives, February 5-8, 2014, Courtesy the artist and SculptureCenter. 
Rachel Rose (b.1986, New York, NY) lives and works in NY. She received her MFA from Columbia, an MA from the Courtauld Institute of Art, and her BA from Yale. Recent exhibitions and screenings include Geographies of Contamination at The David Roberts Foundation (London) and Uncanny Valleys at Electronic Arts Intermix (New York).

ON VIEW AT SCULPTURECENTER

In Practice: Chance Motives, February 5-8, 2014

Rachel RosePalisades in Palisades, 2014. Still from video. Commissioned by SculptureCenter for In Practice: Chance Motives, February 5-8, 2014, Courtesy the artist and SculptureCenter. 

Rachel Rose (b.1986, New York, NY) lives and works in NY. She received her MFA from Columbia, an MA from the Courtauld Institute of Art, and her BA from Yale. Recent exhibitions and screenings include Geographies of Contamination at The David Roberts Foundation (London) and Uncanny Valleys at Electronic Arts Intermix (New York).

ON VIEW AT SCULPTURECENTER: 
In Practice: Chance Motives, February 5-8, 2014
Rachel Rose, Palisades in Palisades, 2014. Still from video. Commissioned by SculptureCenter for In Practice: Chance Motives, February 5-8, 2014, Courtesy the artist and SculptureCenter. 
Rachel Rose (b.1986, New York, NY) lives and works in NY. She received her MFA from Columbia, an MA from the Courtauld Institute of Art, and her BA from Yale. Recent exhibitions and screenings include Geographies of Contamination at The David Roberts Foundation (London) and Uncanny Valleys at Electronic Arts Intermix (New York).

ON VIEW AT SCULPTURECENTER

In Practice: Chance Motives, February 5-8, 2014

Rachel RosePalisades in Palisades, 2014. Still from video. Commissioned by SculptureCenter for In Practice: Chance Motives, February 5-8, 2014, Courtesy the artist and SculptureCenter. 

Rachel Rose (b.1986, New York, NY) lives and works in NY. She received her MFA from Columbia, an MA from the Courtauld Institute of Art, and her BA from Yale. Recent exhibitions and screenings include Geographies of Contamination at The David Roberts Foundation (London) and Uncanny Valleys at Electronic Arts Intermix (New York).

ON VIEW AT SCULPTURECENTER:
Rachel Rose, Palisades in Palisades, 2014. Still from video. Commissioned by SculptureCenter for In Practice: Chance Motives, February 5-8, 2014, Courtesy the artist and SculptureCenter. 

Rachel Rose (b.1986, New York, NY) lives and works in NY. She received her MFA from Columbia, an MA from the Courtauld Institute of Art, and her BA from Yale. Recent exhibitions and screenings include Geographies of Contamination at The David Roberts Foundation (London) and Uncanny Valleys at Electronic Arts Intermix (New York).

ON VIEW AT SCULPTURECENTER:

Rachel RosePalisades in Palisades, 2014. Still from video. Commissioned by SculptureCenter for In Practice: Chance Motives, February 5-8, 2014, Courtesy the artist and SculptureCenter. 

Rachel Rose (b.1986, New York, NY) lives and works in NY. She received her MFA from Columbia, an MA from the Courtauld Institute of Art, and her BA from Yale. Recent exhibitions and screenings include Geographies of Contamination at The David Roberts Foundation (London) and Uncanny Valleys at Electronic Arts Intermix (New York).

IN PRACTICE: CHANCE MOTIVESVanessa Anspaugh, Ben Thorp Brown, Brendan Fernandes, Pedro Neves Marques, Sahra Motalebi, Daniel Neumann, Essex Olivares, Nick Paparone, Rachel Rose, Hayley Aviva Silverman, Conrad Ventur, and Laura Vitale.Guest curated by Kari Rittenbach.Event Date: Saturday, February 8, 11am-6pmOpen Rehearsals: February 5-7, 12-6pm DailyFor more information, please visit: sculpture-center.org

IN PRACTICE: CHANCE MOTIVES

Vanessa Anspaugh, Ben Thorp Brown, Brendan Fernandes, Pedro Neves Marques, Sahra Motalebi, Daniel Neumann, Essex Olivares, Nick Paparone, Rachel Rose, Hayley Aviva Silverman, Conrad Ventur, and Laura Vitale.

Guest curated by Kari Rittenbach.

Event Date: Saturday, February 8, 11am-6pm
Open Rehearsals: February 5-7, 12-6pm Daily

For more information, please visit: sculpture-center.org

FEATURED ARTIST: Erik Wysocan is a New York based artist working across sculpture, painting, installation, and publishing. His experimental practice demonstrates an interest in the visual and material factors on which value production is dependent. Wysocan’s work has previously been exhibited as part of SculptureCenter’s In Practice project series, and this past February, his collaboration with Dexter Sinister was included in White Petals Surround Your Yellow Heart at the ICA Philadelphia. 

image

Erik Wysocan(Antique Fakes and Reproductions, Enlarged and Revised), 2012. Six found reproductions of the bust of Louise Brongniart produced by six different manufacturers: plastic, MDF, and polarizing film. 58 x 16 x 16 in. Courtesy the artist and Laurel Gitlen. 

http://sculpture-center.tumblr.com/

FROM THE ARCHIVES: Kathleen Griffin and Leon Dewan, Everyone Likes to be Wanted, 2003. Candy, ballerinas, circuitry, electricity, light. 
In this collaboration between sound artist Leon Dewan and visual artist Kathleen Griffin, three hollow candy spheres contained spinning plastic ballerinas. The spheres were vibrated at their own frequency and processed through chaos chips.
Part of the In Practice program, this exhibition also featured works by Frantiska and Tim Gilman, Myra Greene, Joanna Malinowska, Dave McKenzie, and Alicia Renadette, and was on view at SculptureCenter from June 21 through August 16, 2003. For information about this year’s open call, visit http://sculpture-center.org/exhibitionsOpenCall.htm. 

FROM THE ARCHIVES: Kathleen Griffin and Leon DewanEveryone Likes to be Wanted, 2003. Candy, ballerinas, circuitry, electricity, light. 

In this collaboration between sound artist Leon Dewan and visual artist Kathleen Griffin, three hollow candy spheres contained spinning plastic ballerinas. The spheres were vibrated at their own frequency and processed through chaos chips.

Part of the In Practice program, this exhibition also featured works by Frantiska and Tim Gilman, Myra Greene, Joanna Malinowska, Dave McKenzie, and Alicia Renadette, and was on view at SculptureCenter from June 21 through August 16, 2003. For information about this year’s open call, visit http://sculpture-center.org/exhibitionsOpenCall.htm

FROM THE ARCHIVES: Garrett Ricciardi and Ross Cisneros, Etheric Projection, 2007. 
This collaboration between Garrett Ricciardi and Ross Cisneros acted as an amusement ride simulator. Passengers were projected through a film of improbable landscapes and encounters that built networks between inert familiarity and active impossibilities. Corporate barons, art history’s environmental activists, and the Cyclops commingled to shape a terrain somewhere between a thrill ride and pulp fiction.
Part of the In Practice program, this exhibition also featured works by Alex Arcadia, Fia Backström, Gardar Eide Einarsson, Amy O’Neill, Lucy Raven, Karin Schneider, and Karen Yasinsky, and was on view from September 9 to November 25, 2007. The current deadline to propose for In Practice is June 17—for information about this year’s open call, visit: http://sculpture-center.org/exhibitionsOpenCall.htm.

FROM THE ARCHIVES: Garrett Ricciardi and Ross Cisneros, Etheric Projection, 2007.

This collaboration between Garrett Ricciardi and Ross Cisneros acted as an amusement ride simulator. Passengers were projected through a film of improbable landscapes and encounters that built networks between inert familiarity and active impossibilities. Corporate barons, art history’s environmental activists, and the Cyclops commingled to shape a terrain somewhere between a thrill ride and pulp fiction.

Part of the In Practice program, this exhibition also featured works by Alex Arcadia, Fia Backström, Gardar Eide Einarsson, Amy O’Neill, Lucy Raven, Karin Schneider, and Karen Yasinsky, and was on view from September 9 to November 25, 2007. The current deadline to propose for In Practice is June 17—for information about this year’s open call, visit: http://sculpture-center.org/exhibitionsOpenCall.htm.

FROM THE ARCHIVES: Agathe Snow, The Asshole of NYC/ The Best Job in the Universe, 2008. 
As a reaction to an article that referenced the artist’s own (and her peers’) creative process, Agathe Snow created an installation using every material described or mentioned in the article. Snow created a landfill of systematized paraphernalia that connoted interior realities and outside fictions. The piece acted as both homage and riposte to the press and, moreover, the idea of classifying a generation, which can fill the artist both with venom and glee.
Part of the In Practice program, this exhibition also featured works by Forde & the Ashbirds, Drew Heitzler, Alix Lambert, Haley Mellin, Leyden Rodriguez-Casanova, and Erik Smith, and was on view from January 13 to March 30, 2008. The current deadline to propose for In Practice is June 17—for information about this year’s open call, visit: http://sculpture-center.org/exhibitionsOpenCall.htm.

FROM THE ARCHIVES: Agathe SnowThe Asshole of NYC/ The Best Job in the Universe, 2008. 

As a reaction to an article that referenced the artist’s own (and her peers’) creative process, Agathe Snow created an installation using every material described or mentioned in the article. Snow created a landfill of systematized paraphernalia that connoted interior realities and outside fictions. The piece acted as both homage and riposte to the press and, moreover, the idea of classifying a generation, which can fill the artist both with venom and glee.

Part of the In Practice program, this exhibition also featured works by Forde & the Ashbirds, Drew Heitzler, Alix Lambert, Haley Mellin, Leyden Rodriguez-Casanova, and Erik Smith, and was on view from January 13 to March 30, 2008. The current deadline to propose for In Practice is June 17—for information about this year’s open call, visit: http://sculpture-center.org/exhibitionsOpenCall.htm.

FROM THE ARCHIVES: Tyler Coburn, Medium No. 1 (Manhattan), 2009. 
Beginning on the first day of the year, Coburn transmitted improvisatory monologues and conversations recorded on walks across Manhattan to a thermal roll fax machine located in SculptureCenter’s basement. These daily transmissions were printed and read as a continuous scroll along a 25-foot long structure, producing an eighty-two day portrait of a city through the interfaces of machine and mind. 
Part of SculptureCenter's In Practice program, this exhibition also featured works by Carey Ascenzo, Becket Bowes, Wojciech Gilewicz, Samara Golden, Rachel Mason, Amy Patton, and Peter Simensky, and was on view from January 1 to March 22, 2009. The current deadline to propose for In Practice is June 17—for information about this year’s open call, visit: http://sculpture-center.org/exhibitionsOpenCall.htm.

FROM THE ARCHIVES: Tyler CoburnMedium No. 1 (Manhattan), 2009. 

Beginning on the first day of the year, Coburn transmitted improvisatory monologues and conversations recorded on walks across Manhattan to a thermal roll fax machine located in SculptureCenter’s basement. These daily transmissions were printed and read as a continuous scroll along a 25-foot long structure, producing an eighty-two day portrait of a city through the interfaces of machine and mind. 

Part of SculptureCenter's In Practice program, this exhibition also featured works by Carey Ascenzo, Becket Bowes, Wojciech Gilewicz, Samara Golden, Rachel Mason, Amy Patton, and Peter Simensky, and was on view from January 1 to March 22, 2009. The current deadline to propose for In Practice is June 17—for information about this year’s open call, visit: http://sculpture-center.org/exhibitionsOpenCall.htm.

FROM THE ARCHIVES: Michael Ashkin, Untitled (where each new sunrise promises only the continuation of yesterday), [an abridged title, the first of twenty-one lines], 2009. Ashkin’s project consisted of a miniaturized model, at a scale of 1:128, of a fictional urban agglomeration. Built entirely of found cardboard, stretching the length of the central basement tunnel at SculptureCenter, the model was based on an architectural and urban typology increasingly found on the outskirts of many cities as a result of rapid urbanization.  
Part of SculptureCenter's In Practice program, this exhibition also featured works by Michael Blum, David Dixon, Simone Leigh, Cindy Loehr, and Virginia Overton, and was on view from May 10 to August 3, 2009. The current deadline to propose for In Practice is June 17—for information about this year’s open call, visit: http://sculpture-center.org/exhibitionsOpenCall.htm.

FROM THE ARCHIVES: Michael AshkinUntitled (where each new sunrise promises only the continuation of yesterday), [an abridged title, the first of twenty-one lines], 2009. Ashkin’s project consisted of a miniaturized model, at a scale of 1:128, of a fictional urban agglomeration. Built entirely of found cardboard, stretching the length of the central basement tunnel at SculptureCenter, the model was based on an architectural and urban typology increasingly found on the outskirts of many cities as a result of rapid urbanization.  

Part of SculptureCenter's In Practice program, this exhibition also featured works by Michael Blum, David Dixon, Simone Leigh, Cindy Loehr, and Virginia Overton, and was on view from May 10 to August 3, 2009. The current deadline to propose for In Practice is June 17—for information about this year’s open call, visit: http://sculpture-center.org/exhibitionsOpenCall.htm.

FROM THE ARCHIVES:  Xaviera Simmons, 3 (Cardboard, Masonite, Twine, Paper, Paint), 2009. As part of the In Practice Fall ‘09 exhibition, Simmons captured a slowly disappearing urban landscape from three different entry points. The artist gathered and broke down over a thousand cardboard boxes from city streets to construct a monochrome wall that stood opposite three panels of collaged photographic images taken while engaging with people and places along her route. Documenting shop signs, buildings, and street scenes, her installation was a meditation on increasingly obsolescent typographies, sayings, and locales.
Part of SculptureCenter's In Practice program, this exhibition also featured works by Jason Kraus, Meredith Nickie, Marlo Pascual, Marianne Vitale, and Erik Wysocan, and was on view from September 13 to November 30, 2009. The current deadline to propose for In Practice is June 17—for information about this year’s open call, visit: http://sculpture-center.org/exhibitionsOpenCall.htm.

FROM THE ARCHIVES:  Xaviera Simmons3 (Cardboard, Masonite, Twine, Paper, Paint), 2009. As part of the In Practice Fall ‘09 exhibition, Simmons captured a slowly disappearing urban landscape from three different entry points. The artist gathered and broke down over a thousand cardboard boxes from city streets to construct a monochrome wall that stood opposite three panels of collaged photographic images taken while engaging with people and places along her route. Documenting shop signs, buildings, and street scenes, her installation was a meditation on increasingly obsolescent typographies, sayings, and locales.

Part of SculptureCenter's In Practice program, this exhibition also featured works by Jason Kraus, Meredith Nickie, Marlo Pascual, Marianne Vitale, and Erik Wysocan, and was on view from September 13 to November 30, 2009. The current deadline to propose for In Practice is June 17—for information about this year’s open call, visit: http://sculpture-center.org/exhibitionsOpenCall.htm.

Paul Branca, Mousse, 2012. Oil on stretched Mousse Magazine tote bag. Courtesy the artist. 
Branca currently participates in SculptureCenter’s 2012-2013 In Practice program, culminating in an exhibition of new work. Double Life opens at SculptureCenter on January 13, 5-7PM and runs through March 25.

Paul BrancaMousse, 2012. Oil on stretched Mousse Magazine tote bag. Courtesy the artist. 

Branca currently participates in SculptureCenter’s 2012-2013 In Practice program, culminating in an exhibition of new work. Double Life opens at SculptureCenter on January 13, 5-7PM and runs through March 25.

Paul Branca, Couch Crash, 2010. Installation view: Golden Parachutes, November 24-December 22, 2010. Courtesy the artist and Golden Parachutes. 
A painting distribution project by Branca presented a series of text paintings that were given away to his friends in Berlin on a first come, first serve basis at the exhibition’s opening. The original nineteen paintings depicted a word or punctuation mark spelling out: HEY JUNGS KÖNNTE ICH ÜBER DER COUCH CRASH, ICH BIN WIRKLICH MÜDE UND KANN ES NICHT WEITERGEHEN (Hey guys could I crash over the couch, I am really tired and I can’t go on).
Branca currently participates in SculptureCenter’s 2012-2013 In Practice program, culminating in an exhibition of new work. Double Life opens at SculptureCenter on January 13, 5-7PM and runs through March 25. 

Paul Branca, Couch Crash, 2010. Installation view: Golden Parachutes, November 24-December 22, 2010. Courtesy the artist and Golden Parachutes. 

A painting distribution project by Branca presented a series of text paintings that were given away to his friends in Berlin on a first come, first serve basis at the exhibition’s opening. The original nineteen paintings depicted a word or punctuation mark spelling out: HEY JUNGS KÖNNTE ICH ÜBER DER COUCH CRASH, ICH BIN WIRKLICH MÜDE UND KANN ES NICHT WEITERGEHEN (Hey guys could I crash over the couch, I am really tired and I can’t go on).

Branca currently participates in SculptureCenter’s 2012-2013 In Practice program, culminating in an exhibition of new work. Double Life opens at SculptureCenter on January 13, 5-7PM and runs through March 25.