SculptureNotebook is an online platform that features artists, events, books, and other cultural material pertinent to issues in contemporary sculpture.

SculptureNotebook is a program of SculptureCenter, a not-for-profit arts institution located in Long Island City, NY and founded by artists in 1928. SculptureCenter focuses on the production of new artwork and presents exhibits by emerging and established artists from New York and around the world.



visit www.sculpture-center.org

FEATURED ARTIST: Morgane Tschiember
Physically and metaphysically, Morgane Tschiember’s practice blurs the distinction between painting and sculpture. Characterized by a wide-open, nonhierarchical approach to materials, her oeuvre inspires new interpretations and unexpected dialogues related to traditional sculptural mediums and techniques. Continually pushing herself and her work in new directions, Tschiember applies hands-on approaches to an ever-increasing cache of materials, which currently includes blown-glass, oil paint, metal, concrete, ceramic, wood, and marble. Addressing essential three-dimensional formal concerns, Tschiember’s sculptures—in particular her large-scale works such as Swing and Asphalt—reference 1970s Minimalism and Conceptualism as well as more recent aesthetics like “Scatter Art.” 
As a result, her sculptures try to not only stand in three dimensions, but include others such as time, action, movement, flux or fluids, opening up the place a piece takes and how it relates to were it stands.
Morgane Tschiember Is represented by Tracy Williams in New York, Loevenbruck Gallery in Paris, and Rolando Anselmi, in Berlin. She made the ISCP residency: international studio and curator programm in 2009, and Nuove Residency in Nove, Italy in 2013. She received Ricard Price, and Sanofi Price.
Upcoming exhibitions include Museum Vitraria, Venice; fiac, Paris; CAC contemporary art center, Vilnius; gallery Rolando Anselmi, Berlin  and Tracy Williams gallery.
Morgane Tschiember, bubbles, 2012. Glass, concrete, iron. Dimensions variable. Courtesy the artist, Tracy Williams Gallery, and Adagp, Paris. 
www.sculpture-center.org

FEATURED ARTIST: Morgane Tschiember

Physically and metaphysically, Morgane Tschiember’s practice blurs the distinction between painting and sculpture. Characterized by a wide-open, nonhierarchical approach to materials, her oeuvre inspires new interpretations and unexpected dialogues related to traditional sculptural mediums and techniques. Continually pushing herself and her work in new directions, Tschiember applies hands-on approaches to an ever-increasing cache of materials, which currently includes blown-glass, oil paint, metal, concrete, ceramic, wood, and marble. Addressing essential three-dimensional formal concerns, Tschiember’s sculptures—in particular her large-scale works such as Swing and Asphalt—reference 1970s Minimalism and Conceptualism as well as more recent aesthetics like “Scatter Art.” 

As a result, her sculptures try to not only stand in three dimensions, but include others such as time, action, movement, flux or fluids, opening up the place a piece takes and how it relates to were it stands.

Morgane Tschiember Is represented by Tracy Williams in New York, Loevenbruck Gallery in Paris, and Rolando Anselmi, in Berlin. She made the ISCP residency: international studio and curator programm in 2009, and Nuove Residency in Nove, Italy in 2013. She received Ricard Price, and Sanofi Price.

Upcoming exhibitions include Museum Vitraria, Venice; fiac, Paris; CAC contemporary art center, Vilnius; gallery Rolando Anselmi, Berlin  and Tracy Williams gallery.

Morgane Tschiember, bubbles, 2012. Glass, concrete, iron. Dimensions variable. Courtesy the artist, Tracy Williams Gallery, and Adagp, Paris. 

www.sculpture-center.org

READING ROOM:
Meriem Bennani & Hayden Dunham, Other Travel (2012).
From Meriem Bennani & Hayden Dunham:

Through a determined process a selection of artists and writers will be invited to participate in this unconventional publication. Each artist involved will receive an invitation to a specific place in New York City where the delivery of an installation or package will take place. The collaboration begins when the artist chooses to produce a piece in response to the installation received. This  exchange will be documented and presented in the Other Travel book in conjunction with an exhibition. 

Featuring collaborations with: Dora Budor, Maja Cule, Amy Von Harrington, Ian Markell, Sara Jane Stoner, Twin Gemz, Travis Boyer, & Nancy Copley
Watch the Other Travel video here.
Courtesy Otherwild.

READING ROOM:

Meriem Bennani & Hayden Dunham, Other Travel (2012).

From Meriem Bennani & Hayden Dunham:

Through a determined process a selection of artists and writers will be invited to participate in this unconventional publication. Each artist involved will receive an invitation to a specific place in New York City where the delivery of an installation or package will take place. The collaboration begins when the artist chooses to produce a piece in response to the installation received. This  exchange will be documented and presented in the Other Travel book in conjunction with an exhibition. 

Featuring collaborations with: Dora Budor, Maja Cule, Amy Von Harrington, Ian Markell, Sara Jane Stoner, Twin Gemz, Travis Boyer, & Nancy Copley

Watch the Other Travel video here.

Courtesy Otherwild.

READING ROOM:
Amelia Barikin and Helen Hughes (eds), Making Worlds: Art and Science Fiction (Surpllus Publishing, 2013).
From Surpllus:

Making Worlds: Art and Science Fiction is an anthology of new texts by artists, curators, art historians and writers who are self-confessed science fiction fans. The linking point is the idea of science fiction as a platform for the building of alternate art histories. This collection is concerned with the ways in which science fiction might be performed, materialised or enacted within a contemporary context.
Edited by Amelia Barikin and Helen Hughes, with contributions by: Adrian Martin, Amelia Barikin, Andrew Frost, Anthony White, Arlo Mountford, Brendan Lee, Charles Green, Chris McAuliffe, Chronox, Damiano Bertoli, Darren Jorgensen, Dylan Martorell, Edward Colless, Helen Hughes, Helen Johnson, Justin Clemens, Lauren Bliss, Matthew Shannon, Nathan Gray, Nick Selenitsch, OSW, Patrick Pound, Philip Brophy, Rex Butler, Ryan Johnston, and Soda_Jerk.

Courtesy MADA Archive.

READING ROOM:

Amelia Barikin and Helen Hughes (eds), Making Worlds: Art and Science Fiction (Surpllus Publishing, 2013).

From Surpllus:

Making Worlds: Art and Science Fiction is an anthology of new texts by artists, curators, art historians and writers who are self-confessed science fiction fans. The linking point is the idea of science fiction as a platform for the building of alternate art histories. This collection is concerned with the ways in which science fiction might be performed, materialised or enacted within a contemporary context.

Edited by Amelia Barikin and Helen Hughes, with contributions by: Adrian Martin, Amelia Barikin, Andrew Frost, Anthony White, Arlo Mountford, Brendan Lee, Charles Green, Chris McAuliffe, Chronox, Damiano Bertoli, Darren Jorgensen, Dylan Martorell, Edward Colless, Helen Hughes, Helen Johnson, Justin Clemens, Lauren Bliss, Matthew Shannon, Nathan Gray, Nick Selenitsch, OSW, Patrick Pound, Philip Brophy, Rex Butler, Ryan Johnston, and Soda_Jerk.

Courtesy MADA Archive.

READING ROOM:
Maria Loboda, Oh, Wilderness (Sternberg Press, 2012).
From Sternberg:

'Verbal sculptures' and 'strange archaeologies'—Maria Loboda’s recent works expose prior events through sparse details of entangled secrets, material contradictions, and masked collusions. Her sculpture is both indulgently verbal and obstinately reserved. Oh, Wilderness also demonstrates the artist’s aesthetic equation between language and materiality as it works the other way around, translating materials expressive of a certain weak semiotics to language. Through these materials, nature is observed and read—now constituting a grammar, rigorously arbitrary, formal, and conventional. 

Read about Maria Loboda’s involvement in the current SC exhibition Puddle, Pothole, Portal (October 2, 2014 - January 5, 2015).
Courtesy Sternberg Press.

READING ROOM:

Maria Loboda, Oh, Wilderness (Sternberg Press, 2012).

From Sternberg:

'Verbal sculptures' and 'strange archaeologies'—Maria Loboda’s recent works expose prior events through sparse details of entangled secrets, material contradictions, and masked collusions. Her sculpture is both indulgently verbal and obstinately reserved. Oh, Wilderness also demonstrates the artist’s aesthetic equation between language and materiality as it works the other way around, translating materials expressive of a certain weak semiotics to language. Through these materials, nature is observed and read—now constituting a grammar, rigorously arbitrary, formal, and conventional. 

Read about Maria Loboda’s involvement in the current SC exhibition Puddle, Pothole, Portal (October 2, 2014 - January 5, 2015).

Courtesy Sternberg Press.

Puddle, pothole, portal, curated by Ruba Katrib and artist Camille Henrot is now on view at SculptureCenter! 
Olga Balema, Joachim Bandau, Camille Blatrix, Teresa Burga, Antoine Catala, Abigail DeVille, Jos de Gruyter & Harald Thys, Judith Hopf, Jamian Juliano-Villani, Allison Katz, Mark Leckey, Maria Loboda, Win McCarthy, Danny McDonald, Marlie Mul, Mick Peter, Chadwick Rantanen, Lucie Stahl, Saul Steinberg, Keiichi Tanaami, Lina Viste Grønli, and Jordan Wolfson.
Thinking through early 20th century cartoons, the kaleidoscopic drawings of Saul Steinberg, the innovative and self-reflexive film Who Framed Roger Rabbit, and other children’s entertainment, the exhibition explores the coexistence of disparate elements within shared spaces. Gags betray complex meanings and sociopolitical satire, and unrelated objects, locales, and avatars interact in the same dimension. The works on view transcend the categories that separate drawing from sculpture, the human from the nonhuman, and the animated from the static, while experiences of technological devices and flatness lead to fantastic and absurd implications for objects and space. As screens, passageways, and shadows populate both physical and virtual realms, we question whether they are reflections or traces of the objective world, obstructions, fantasies, or entryways into other realms. 
http://sculpture-center.org/

Puddle, pothole, portal, curated by Ruba Katrib and artist Camille Henrot is now on view at SculptureCenter

Olga Balema, Joachim Bandau, Camille Blatrix, Teresa Burga, Antoine Catala, Abigail DeVille, Jos de Gruyter & Harald Thys, Judith Hopf, Jamian Juliano-Villani, Allison Katz, Mark Leckey, Maria Loboda, Win McCarthy, Danny McDonald, Marlie Mul, Mick Peter, Chadwick Rantanen, Lucie Stahl, Saul Steinberg, Keiichi Tanaami, Lina Viste Grønli, and Jordan Wolfson.

Thinking through early 20th century cartoons, the kaleidoscopic drawings of Saul Steinberg, the innovative and self-reflexive film Who Framed Roger Rabbit, and other children’s entertainment, the exhibition explores the coexistence of disparate elements within shared spaces. Gags betray complex meanings and sociopolitical satire, and unrelated objects, locales, and avatars interact in the same dimension. The works on view transcend the categories that separate drawing from sculpture, the human from the nonhuman, and the animated from the static, while experiences of technological devices and flatness lead to fantastic and absurd implications for objects and space. As screens, passageways, and shadows populate both physical and virtual realms, we question whether they are reflections or traces of the objective world, obstructions, fantasies, or entryways into other realms. 

http://sculpture-center.org/

WHAT’S ON: Oranbeg NET 10 web exhibition, curated by SC SculptureNotebook Featured Artist Max Marshall of The Latent Image.

Featuring Collin AveryRoxana AzarSergiy BarchukMichael BussellCasey James WilsonCorey Olsen and Robin Myers

Download PDF